these HU numbers?

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Gwyd
    Participant
    Post count: 81
    #10428 |

    not that there’ll be much chance to use them atm but:
    who knows how these HU numbers work?
    im guessing map codes or something but it baffles me
    e.g. (HU189493)
    tried to find ‘Fildar geo’ last summer but we ended up gorge running at random locations to no avail :/

    Al
    Keymaster
    Post count: 860
    #10429 |

    They’re Ordnance Survey grid references. Used by old people that still use maps.

    HU references the grid square of the UK, HU covering most of Shetland and the the 6 numbers pinpoint a spot to an accuracy of 10m. Usually if trying to find somewhere new, it’s worth taking a map with you with the grid reference marked on. It can be surprisingly hard and tricky if you don’t, even if you think you know the area!

    I suggest a crash course, and who better to teach you than adventurer extrordinaire Simon King…

    If you’ve got more time then try this: http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/docs/ebooks/map-reading.pdf

    Once done, go for a walk on Ronas Hill in the mist and see if you’ve understood it. šŸ˜‰

    longa
    Participant
    Post count: 472
    #10430 |

    Al, 6FGR defines a 100m square, not 10m.

    Al
    Keymaster
    Post count: 860
    #10431 |

    Oh yeah, good point! Obviously just a typo šŸ˜‰

    Ross
    Participant
    Post count: 165
    #10432 |

    I don’t know Gwyd……. to think that Al and Andrew went to all that trouble to design the ShetlandClimbing Info website so that it even provides you a map with an arrow pointing out the location and you didn’t find it?

    Ross
    Participant
    Post count: 165
    #10433 |

    I understood that said “adventurer extrordinaire” didn’t appreciate certain people venturing near cliffs as it was far too dangerous šŸ˜‰

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